As Kermit the Frog might say...

... if he were a choral conductor, "It's not easy being seen."  I received the following yesterday from a singer who shall remain anonymous:  
 
Q: "How many conductors does it take to change a lightbulb?"  
 
A:  "We don't know - nobody is ever watching."
 
Thanks, Linda.  I'll remember that...

An extension of yesterday's post

In reply to yesterday's post about young people and classical music, my friend Mary Beth Sederburg posted the following comment:
 

You said the magic words..."comfortable" and "familiarity". for the most part our younger generations have little of either, when it comes to classical music.
You're right about state support for the arts in Europe and we know what a tough time the NEA has here.

Back to blogging - actually about music!

Sorry for the hiatus in posts - it's been the usual beginning-of-school-and-season mix of choosing Baroque ensemble pieces for electric guitarists (actually, lots of percussionists this semester), finishing up arrangements, grading quizzes, and so on.  But in the brief pause before midterms I'm going to hopefully get in a few posts.
 

A self-explanatory post!

One stop shopping: 
 
 

A Grand Day Out II

One of our adopted Rollett wayward musicians, Matt Sware, came to visit last weekend.  I asked him what he wanted to do while he was here, and he pointed out that he had never seen either of the Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the area.  So Saturday was a marathon.  Tony and Sara were unable to join in - Sara had to work and Tony is in China, so it was just Matt and me.  Since I was booking the tours so late, we had to be there at 10 am (groan - it is a close to 2 hour drive...)

Photo-Geekery

 I have some exciting news for those of you who, like me, are too lazy to carry around a camera (or too lazy to look for the camera you have, in my case.)  Our camera went missing at the beginning of the summer, so all of my blog photos, other than some that were already in iPhoto, have been taken with my iPhone, and generally speaking I've been quite impressed with what a good job it does, given sufficient light.  One thing that I've found quite frustrating, though, is that

Garden update, with animal inclusions

I've been toiling relentlessly at my computer - working hard, to make up for hardly working so much of the summer.  But the other day the view out the window called to me, and I knew that I had to do some gardening. 
 

New Mexico Part 2

Besides hiking, we did a bit of rubbernecking, and Taos was our first stop.  We only had about half a day, and so had to concentrate our efforts to what really matters - food and shopping.  We had planned to lunch at Roberto's, which my brother recommended and I remembered from many years ago.  To our disappointment, it has closed, for good.  A cursory search of the surrounding area revealed a number of restaurants, none of which actually served Mexican food.  So out came

In the Land of Enchantment

For you Easterners that might not know these things, "The Land of Enchantment" is New Mexico's moniker.  It is, too, for a number of reasons.  Here is one - the view of the Sangre de Cristo mountains from my brother's back yard.
 

The Train Trip

Edmund and I recently experienced the joys of train travel.  We had planned to go to New Mexico in August to visit my mom, brother, sister-in-law, and nephews, and originally we were going to fly out, but on a whim we decided to take Amtrak.  This is perhaps not the most efficient way to get there, but we thought that we would make the trip itself part of the adventure.