Back "En Selle" Again

 In case you're wondering, "en selle" is "in the saddle," en français. And I'm back in the cooking saddle, at any rate. Tony is on sabbatical, and I'm along for the ride. At the moment he is a "Distinguised Visiting Professor" at the Paris School of Mines, Cote d'Azur campus. You can tell how highly he is valued, because he was presented with BOTH the special mug AND the special pen.
 
My job is to make sure he keeps up his strength with lots of nice food. We are staying in an apartment, which is a new experience for us. We did once live in a sort of apartment for a few months in Germany, but it was free-standing. This apartment is in a block of flats, and although I did once live in such a place for a time during college, Tony has never had this particular experience. It's actually a bit like being at camp, as it has a set of bunk beds instead of the usual double bed. Tony has to sleep on the top bunk. It's only right, as he's 5 months younger than I am, and presumably proportionately spryer.
 
The apartement does have a kitchen, of sorts. Here is a picture of it: 

 
There are two electric burners, a refrigerator underneath, an oven above (it looks like a microwave, but it is a standard, if small, oven,) and, strangely, a full-sized dishwasher. It's hard for me to understand why someone would prefer a full-sized dishwasher to a proper stove, but there you are. I don't think that we could fill the dishwasher unless we put every single dish in the apartment into it. We use it as a large drying rack.
 
The other curiosity is that the refrigerator is only a part-time appliance. Well, that's not exactly the case. But you enter the apartment with a card that you stick into a card reader, and when you walk into the room there is a little box that you stick the card into which turns on the power. This is all very well, except that when the power is off the fridge is off as well. After a few days of being puzzled as to why the food never seemed very cold, we've settled that Tony's card stays in the power box, and I make sure to be at the apartment when he comes home. It's just lucky that we didn't die of food poisoning those first few days!
 
Well, that's all for the moment, as the "restaurant" on the ground floor of the apartment building, which is the reasonably-priced place to get the wifi, is about to close. (You can pay for wifi in your room, at the rate of something like 6 euros per hour.) So the next post will get into the nitty-gritty of French cooking, and maybe will even feature a recipe or two - you never know!